Gender, Religion and IVF

A focus on condemning particular therapies and methods of intervention, or on the limits of individual autonomy, overlooks crucial dimensions of the lived experience of infertility globally.

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Assisted Reproductive Technologies and Parenthood in Islam: A Response to Thomas Eich

In his recent blog post, Thomas Eich asks if particular issues of medical ethics are “really only about the issue at hand, as is usually claimed in the course of such debates?” “How strong is the presence of other factors in these debates,” he continues, “which are not directly linked to the medical technology under discussion?” Read the full article »

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Islamic Discourses on Assisted Reproductive Technologies

Several years ago I attended a workshop in Switzerland where scholars from several European countries, as well as religious representatives from Niger and the Middle East, discussed issues relating to assisted reproductive technologies. I remember one particular exchange vividly. I wanted to inquire as to the opinion of the Chief Judge (Qadi) of a major Middle Eastern City on the issue of heterologous insemination. Read the full article »

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The Case of the “Two-Minus-One” Pregnancy

In post-Enlightenment secular bioethics, the default value has become the autonomy and choice of the individual. But Christian and Muslims traditions are, of course, skeptical of this shift. Unless we critically examine the social context and structures which shape and even coerce our “autonomous” and “free” choice, we cannot hope to adequately engage bioethical issues. Read the full article »

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