The Many Faces of Lament

How do Christians who have experienced the indescribable love of God in their suffering, and from it draw out unfathomable hope, relate to those who also practice lament and seek hope, but are not Christian?

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Two American Fears: Islamophobia and Homophobia

ALI ALTAF MIAN

This moment presents both difficulties and opportunities for analyzing the intersections of Islamophobia and homophobia. By historicizing the emergence of each, we gain analytical clarity about the complex negotiations of identity, never static but always becoming.

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What’s ethical about popular casuistry?

KYLE LAMBELET

Lynch’s proposal strikes me as potentially quite fruitful as a mode of ethical and political analysis. She not only retrieves the notion of casuistry, but develops it as a lens to understand the everyday ethics of humanitarian actors. To harvest these fruits, however, I want to encourage Lynch to further clarity about the conceptual work that casuistry does in her research. Read the full article »

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Religious humanitarians and the challenges of history

ATALIA OMER

Lynch’s research is to be celebrated for the ways it foregrounds and explicates the importance of interrogating the discursive formations that inform religious ethics and popular casuistry. Her neo-Weberian framing allows for an elastic lens through which to examine the intersections of neoliberal and (African) orientalist discourses in the diffusion and praxis of the technocratic donor-driven apparatus of humanitarianism and development work. Read the full article »

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